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Fantasies of Shakespeare abound in my brain. Due to some reminisces, I have begun to cast my Ideal RIII, War of the Roses Cycle, and Hamlet. (The Bamber versions)


EDWARD THE FOURTH: Douglas Sills

Sons to the King
EDWARD, PRINCE OF WALES:
RICHARD, DUKE OF YORK: Freddie Highmore

Brothers to the King
GEORGE, DUKE OF CLARENCE: James McAvoy
RICHARD, DUKE OF GLOUCESTER: Jamie Bamber

A YOUNG SON OF CLARENCE
HENRY, EARL OF RICHMOND: Ewan McGregor
CARDINAL BOURCHIER, ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY
THOMAS ROTHERHAM, ARCHBISHOP OF YORK
JOHN MORTON, BISHOP OF ELY
DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM: Chiwetel Ejiofor
DUKE OF NORFOLK
EARL OF SURREY
EARL RIVERS
MARQUIS OF DORSET
LORD GREY
EARL OF OXFORD
LORD HASTINGS
LORD LOVEL
LORD STANLEY
SIR THOMAS VAUGHAN
SIR RICHARD RATCLIFF: David Tennant
SIR WILLIAM CATESBY
SIR JAMES TYRREL
SIR JAMES BLOUNT
SIR WALTER HERBERT
SIR WILLIAM BRANDON
SIR ROBERT BRAKENBURY:
CHRISTOPHER URSWICK
LORD MAYOR OF LONDON
SHERIFF OF WILTSHIRE
HASTINGS
TRESSEL
BERKELEY
ELIZABETH: Tilda Swinton
MARGARET: Emma Thompson or Helen Mirren
DUCHESS OF YORK: Mary McDonnell
LADY ANNE: Emma Watson
A YOUNG DAUGHTER OF CLARENCE

Others to cast:
Paul Gross
Robert Sean Leonard

WORKS VERY MUCH IN PROGRESS
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We have now added podcasting and blogging to the list of things Geoff wants for Midsummer. It should be really awesome, but it's a lot of responsibility for me. He also wants to write a piece on the Wiki to be published in Theatre Topics. I get more nervous about this every day.
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We talked LARP in Midsummer meeting. Also, what the flower will be and what kind of magic the faeries actually have. Devon and I actually riff surprisingly well. I feel like Geoff is going in a much more presentational direction than I was hoping, but, y'know, whatever. I'm just the dramaturg. I'm not a fan of the current forest set design idea (fabric panels) but maybe a model will change my mind.
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Geoff is looking at a 60's-80's prom concept right now. I think it's really interesting. Theseus and Hippolyta as Prom King and Queen, the faeries having an underground anti-prom that the lovers flee to, the mechanicals as the AV club. The costumes and the music could end up really awesome. (Goth faeries is fairly intriguing) We listened to some Ann Hampton Callway, and I'm to be putting together a CD for him of things that would work for the end of the play. This makes right the things that distress me about the dramamturgy class.
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Notes/HUM120 class/Oct 12, 2005

The class in general is fairly reticent about discussing the play. They brought up a lot of the basics that we/I associate with R&J; massive overdoing, broad comedy, mix of styles, "star-crossed" lovers, derivative nature of Shakespearean plots, contrast between high tragic romance and the very young protagonists. No real comments on the plot itself or the structure of the play.
Watched the first ten minutes of the old BBC R&J with Alan Rickman as Tybalt. Interesting though very poor film techniques.
Watched the first ten minutes of the Zeffirelli. Totally different style, the difference between filmed play and movie.
Both versions provoked giggles for dated style and possible melodrama. Will attend 6:30 screening of the Baz version and see how they react to that.
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Having read the first entry in the first of The Production Notebooks, I find myself preferring Geoff's case study, possibly because he goes into more detail. I am concerned, personally, with my changing connection with Geoff. I think he's a great professor and I love him, but he's a different kind of dramaturg than I think I want him to be. He's a very academic dramaturg, which makes him an excellent teacher, and he's passionately committed to the theory of dramaturgy, but...he doesn't work in the professional world much and, in fact, he prefers not to. I'm itching to work professionally more. I think eventually it's going to cause a rift between us because of my more aggressive nature.

It seems wise and beneficial to truly document my process for Midsummer, as it may come in handy later.

On March 25, 2005, I was invited into a meeting with Geoff and Jac about possible plans for the coming years in theatre. Geoff said that he was interested in directing Midsummer and that he wanted me to dramaturg it. He talked a little bit about his process and how he saw the coming year and a half going. He said that he realized that I'd worked with the play before and wanted me to think and be sure that I could follow whatever course he decided on. He talked for about five minutes before he let me say yes.

Over the summer holiday, I re-read the script, ordered some research materials, and cut and pasted the entire script into the pair of oversized sketch books that will be my main work point for this process. I began the process of transferring the folio punctuation into the Arden copies I had pasted and found it very slow going. I got about five Arden pages in when I discovered a Folio suggestion that the "Stand forth" lines in the first scene were stage directions and not spoken lines as they are usually used. The implications of this are interesting in terms of the pacing of the scene and the changes in meter wrought by not speaking these lines. I also began running scantion in my script, seeking out lines with irregular meter and discovering the various ways that the lines could either be made to fit in iambic pentameter through changes in emphasis or pronunciation or the reasonings possible behind feminine endings and other changes in meter. The problem with this work is that it is very detail oriented and I find I greatly benefit from companionship while working on it, making it less than ideal for summer work.

Since returning to campus, I have met with Geoff and am beginning a truly gung-ho dive into the text and the process. My current emphasis is on the faeries. I am reading books about faeries, faery tales themselves, essays about the effects of faery tales, connections between modern faery tales and ancient myth, and the thoughts of authors who write modern faery tales. I have the New Variorum edition of the play text and my Folio edition in modern type will be arriving this week. I am collecting music relating to faeries, including any songs I can find with the word "fairy" or "fairies" in the title, as well as Henry Purcell's opera The Fairy Queen, also Elizabethan lute music. Next weekend's goal will likely be the beginnings of image searches. I would love to alllow this to eat up all my time, unfortunately, I still have to complete my undergraduate degree...
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I spent the weekend downloading songs that in some way pertain to faeries and am now listening to them. Some of them are interesting, some of them are boring, and I cannot figure out how anyone listens to techno/electronica. It's all little beeps. But I'm starting, I think to get a feel for how people view faeries, by the types of music that are associated with faeries...

::edit::
Bells. Lots and lots of jingly little bells. Short notes in quick runs. Light and frolicky for the most part. Interesting...I feel like what I've read of the faeries of olde would lead me in a completely different direction.
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Baltar's first name is Gaius. So was Octavius Caesar's. Connection? Don't know why but reading about Antony and Cleopatra made me think of Apollo and Starbuck. Strange feeling, should explore. No time now.
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Dramaturgy ramblings...

It's probably a bad thing when one's passion makes one not want to be where one is. I'm reading Geoff's case study on Antony and Cleopatra (or Antonym and Cleopatra, according to Word) and finding myself desperately wanting to dive into Midsummer and really work the text. There are about ten different essays I need to track down about fairy tales and the processes behind them, I've barely started restoring punctuation, I want to look at at least three other versions of the script (Variorum tops the list), I need to look for artists' renditions of Oberon, Titania, and Puck, at the very least, I need to listen to the opera...And I want to work on it now instead of declining Latin nouns and reading about the ways in which we persuade. I'm thrilled beyond thrilled with this assignment, but it's killing me to know that it's really still a year off.

Of course, I'm also still hyped like no other about my independent study. I'm meeting with Jac soon about how connected to the department my first reading is going to be, I need to compose my survey, I need to put out posters/feelers about interviews with a wide variety of people ([livejournal.com profile] amaresu, [livejournal.com profile] lornelover, [livejournal.com profile] melomena, y'all are on that list...) I have tons of books that I'm desperate to read through, I haven't finished The Shakespeare Company yet, I keep getting distracted. Maybe Jac is right, I should keep my involvement down this semester to give myself more time to play...

I feel like my manifesto for Playwrighting is going to be a lot more OMGSHAKESPEARE!!!!11!! than anything else. I can't help it...It's just...There is so much excitement, it's such a physical, mental, emotional rush to work with Shakespeare. I want to do everything and yell and dance and cry and fly. I don't know why I do theatre. I don't know why I love Shakespeare. But it's the best most fantastic drug there has ever, ever been. I'm totally addicted. More than the internet, more than anything else.

And I am so not doing my homework right now...

(X-Posted to [livejournal.com profile] dramaturgca)
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It's very interesting how often the word dream appears in Richard III. I may have to go back through and look for other references to untruth in the play. I'm sure someone else has already explored this, but I'm going to look into it, just for kicks...